Tag Archives: Namco

A Change of Pace: Back Alley Brawl

“This bear comes out of nowhere and then slaps us around like we’re his hoes.” – Stan Burdman, professional reviewer

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It’s easy to comment and blog about professional games with well made mechanics and competent programming. So lets pick on a lousy PC game by the name of Back Alley Brawl, an incompetently made fighting game that’s available to download for free as no-one would pay for this, they wouldn’t even accept payment to play this.

Given the hot topic of my Game Engine’s class this week is A.I., Back Alley Brawl is an example of how NOT to design opponent A.I., one of the most important components of a fighting is challenge, it’s important that your opponent can fight at your level to keep the game interesting. The programmers of the A.I. in this game are the equivalent of a parents who lets their child wander all around the place. While you’re fighting, your opponent will walk around aimlessly and even keep walking into a wall. Someone hasn’t heard of the A* algorithm.

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Not sure if complete moron or training like the protagonist from Turkish Star Wars.

I apologize for comparing the opponent’s A.I to a child, even a child knows not to walk into a wall. I remember my Introduction to Programming professor Amin Ibrahim commenting on the first day how a child will learn to not put its hand on fire after getting hurt once, while a program or machine won’t learn unless its code tells it otherwise. The first rule of coding, broken by people would can develop a functional game.

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Where’s the playability? WHERE IS IT?

It’s quite the far cry from Namco Bandai’s Dragoball Z and Naruto games where the characters are always in a state of facing each other; all their movements are based on a grid with the camera managing to keep both players on the screen and opponent A.I. that doesn’t go wandering around. Though it helps that those games were programmed by decent human beings, rather than which ever chimp programmed this. He even inserted himself into the roster Shyamalan style with special guest character Miley Cyrus, another reason to play Namco’s fighters, they include guest characters in Soul Caliber who’ve had GOOD games.

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The reason I chose to blog about this game is because unfortunately at our level, our GDW games are closer to the quality of this game than to something like Tekken. Whereas Tekken managed to make fighting a bear a popular and plausible contest outside the Russian Federation, this game stands as proof of PC gaming’s inferiority to consoles where you can download Tekken Revoltution for free. Sorry if I keep mentioning Namco a lot in this blog, being away from home for college causes withdrawal symptoms.

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Klonoa and its distinct 2.5D camera system

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Klonoa: Door to Phantomile (and its Wii remake) is a side-scrolling platform game viewed from a “2.5D” perspective. The player moves the protagonist, Klonoa, along a path in a two-dimensional fashion, but the game is rendered in three dimensions. This allows the path followed to curve and for the player to interact with objects outside of the path.

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The term “2.5D” is also applied (though mathematically incorrect) to 3D games that use polygonal 3D graphics in order to render the world and characters, but the gameplay is still restricted to a 2D plane or gameplay system. The term is rather loose as term because it generally refers to any game with 3D graphics that feature any sort of 2D playing style.

For example, the Crash Bandicoot games of the Playstation 1 were considered 2.5D because despite the 3D graphics, most levels are not as free roaming as its competitor at the time Super Mario 64. There were even some levels where you can only traverse left and right (except maybe a part at the beginning and end where you move to and from your goal).

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The main problem is that the assumption of Crash Bandicoot being 2.5D is based on shallow aspects such as level layout and camera perspective of those levels, I’m not saying they’re not important, but in this case those aspects don’t make it a 2.5 game.

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The New Super Mario Bros. are also considered examples of the sub-genre as it uses 3D models and animations, but other than that it’s strictly 2D, the 3D parts of it are mere aesthetics. Layout, design, play style and controls, all of it is 2D. Street Fighter IV is another game considered 2.5D for similar reasons due to its 2D gameplay coupled with its 3D rendering.

I consider Klonoa to be the purest example of the subgenre because the combined design of the level layout, the gameplay and especially the camera angle are all 2D with 3D elements thrown in which is essentially the textbook definition of the term.

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Like many platformers you have a camera that interpolates accordingly along with the character’s ever changing position in a similar manner to other popular platformers like Mario. However there are points where you will end up turning as the level is not a straight line, when that happens the camera remains parallel to the character while maintaining a certain distance throughout, which includes moments when your character jumps towards the screen which is an example of a dynamic camera angle.

I chose this game in particular because it’s an example of how camera dynamics can ultimately create a new genre in a sense. Like in movies, camera works don’t just provide a visual of the audience but a whole new perspective.