The game engine I am destined to create

Every aspiring game developer has hopes of making the next great game, or for those who are more realistic, make a game that can be enjoyed by people while paying your light bill. Strangely enough, it’s usually those starting out in their game development school who think the former while people with more education in the field along with more experience tend to sway towards the latter.

Does it necessarily have to do with the fact that our youthful energy is being syphoned out of us as we progress?

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Considering it is university yes, however the main reason is as we mature we develop a more realistic outlook on things which makes us set realistic goals. How you set the scope for your projects may make or break it with carefully consideration of your resources, talents and limitations.

Hence why we’re studying Game Engine Design and Implementation, to culminate all our coding knowledge so far to be able to put together a workable engine that can support graphics, animation, gaming mechanics and all our gaming knowledge. So for this blog, I will talk about how I would design the engine of a standard platform game.

The term game engine was coined in the nineties in which it was referring to first-person shooters such as Id’s prolific title Doom due to how intricately its architecture was defined. With separation between core software components, art assets and gameplay mechanics, this is when developers started licencing games and re-tooling them into newer games which opened a whole new world for independent studios and other small organizations.

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The game in question will be based on Uncharted’s engine along with the player mechanics of the Spiderman games and the recent Ninja Gaiden games. Given that the engine in question contains many of the ideal mechanics required to put out a solid platformer on the level of Crash Bandicoot which was also created and published by Naughty Dog.

I intend to use this engine as a template for other types of games such as adventure and fighting games since those are the types of games I intend to make and both games require the following:

–       A third-person view camera that follows your characters and stays focused on the players general area in order to focus on its location and the surrounding radius to alert the player of incoming hazards.

–       A camera collision system to ensure that view points never go into places it’s not supposed such as into the background or into a mountain.

–       A rich set of animations rendered for all sorts of commands from climbing to fighting.

–       User inputs that allow players to execute all sorts of tasks.

I mentioned earlier that I aim to include the player mechanics of Spiderman from the Spiderman games and Ryu Hayabusa from the Ninja Gaiden games. Why you ask? Because both characters both characters can do virtually anything; from jumping to climbing to fighting. More than most characters, they do the best job of making the player feel like their capabilities are limitless.

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Spiderman for the Playstation, the game the developers of Superman 64 wish they’d made.

There has never been a concrete measurement or assessment of how a game can be good as games can be good for several different reasons, in my opinion, I think the ultimate way to determine a game’s quality is to identity how deeply you can immerse players into the experience and what better way to do so that with a character who can do just about everything.

This is why user inputs is very important, the possibilities of the game’s world is placed in their hand and the transition from one action to the next should be seamless and effortless on the part of the player.

In order to ensure an acceptable framerate it’s important to design the engine so that it can manage all the objects on screen without slowing down the action. In this regard we can take a page out of Insomniac’s hit title Spyro which managed to create massive worlds with distances that expanded to the horizon without relying on fog effects, this was done writing code that would decrease and increase the polygon count of far away objects relative to your character’s distance. This way objects can be slowly loaded over time so as not to overload the console.

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Platformers tended to be drawn and designed in cartoon like manners with little emphasis on realism. I grew up with cartoons and platformers such as Mario, Crash Bandicoot and Sonic, so I intend to use such a style. Many of these games relied on principles of animation such as anticipation, squash and stretch, pose to pose, timing and exaggeration in order to achieve the cartoon-like style they were aiming for.

Most of these games were made before Smilebit’s Jet Set Radio spearheaded the use of toon shading in games. I like the toon shading effect because it gives games the comic book feel that I like, however since most of these games were animated and rendered the way they were prior to cel-shading, it’s important to realize that just combing them would be overkill, so it’s important not to just throw them together but to create a balance.

Motion capture generally results in the smoothest and most realistic movement animations so I appoint to utilize it with motion capture artists who can capture the exaggerated movements of cartoon characters in conjunction with the model rendering to capture the less feasible principles such as exaggeration when it comes to characters changing size for the sake of humor.

That’s all for now, it’s still pretty early in the course with much to learn on game engines hence my immature knowledge of the subject, so I just gave you may basic understanding based on previous education and a lifetime passion for gaming. Stay tuned to my blog and see how far I come with my understanding of the topic.

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